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A sighted user question

Daniel McGee
 

Hi all, even though this app is designed for VoiceOver users, I had a thought and would like to share it with you all. Even though when one has sight and can tap the spacebar, return, symbol keys to input the desired function, would they be losing a second or two of speed. The reason why I asked this, is because I wondered if you use FlickType and have vision, is it quicker from a sighted point of view to tap a spacebar or in this case to swipe right after a word and continue on typing. If anyone on the list is sighted, I hope you are able to understand what I am somewhat poorly trying to explain into words but from a VoiceOver point of view to a visual one.

Daniel

Chuck Dean
 

I do not know whether it would be faster to use the FlickType keyboard, the problem would be in the learning curve. Using the iOS keyboard is more familiar to sighted people and easier to use. I was on a flight many years ago using the Fleksy app, and the man sitting next to me asked how I was typing so fast. I explained the app, and how to use it, and also explained he could download it for free. Once he looked at the keyboard, and learned the different gestures, he said he would stick to the iOS keyboard, because learning how to use Fleksy was too much work. Some sighted people may want to use FlickType, but I wouldn't encourage it... That is what killed Fleksy.


Chuck

On May 13, 2018, at 8:47 AM, Daniel McGee <danielmcgee134@...> wrote:

Hi all, even though this app is designed for VoiceOver users, I had a thought and would like to share it with you all. Even though when one has sight and can tap the spacebar, return, symbol keys to input the desired function, would they be losing a second or two of speed. The reason why I asked this, is because I wondered if you use FlickType and have vision, is it quicker from a sighted point of view to tap a spacebar or in this case to swipe right after a word and continue on typing. If anyone on the list is sighted, I hope you are able to understand what I am somewhat poorly trying to explain into words but from a VoiceOver point of view to a visual one.

Daniel

 

Hi Daniel,

Kosta and I are both sighted and yes flicking is faster for all spectrums of sight. Once I went from using gesture-based input back to standard spacebar and delete requirements it was a quite tough transition. The correction method used for FlickType is not well-suited for the sighted community. For example, "respect me" versus "correct me" are two fundamental difference with low-vision and sighted users, for a sighted user they expect that the letters they tap will be the letters shown in the word, whereas low-vision and blind users expect the expect the letters to be corrected when there are mis-taps and really just care about their intended word being shown in the suggestions. Our correction engine is pattern based and not letter based, because of this, we will not be pursuing the sighted market, of course, if a sighted user wants to use FlickType they can, but we will not be adjusting our correction method for them.

Warmly,
Ashley

Daniel McGee
 

Hi Ashley, that is very interesting to know how someone sighted or non sighted typing ability changes respected to FlickType or a standard stock keyboard.

Of course, I wouldn't want you to change the target audience of the app. Just continue with what your doing, developing the app for blind and low vision users.

I was just curious from a fully sighted point of view if the keyboard was any faster in regards to a spacebar or swiping right after a word.

Now I know and thank you for the detailed exclamation and chuck for the flight situation that you so clearly explained with the other gentlemen.
Regards

Daniel

On 14 May 2018, at 03:44, FlickType <@FlickType> wrote:

Hi Daniel,

Kosta and I are both sighted and yes flicking is faster for all spectrums of sight. Once I went from using gesture-based input back to standard spacebar and delete requirements it was a quite tough transition. The correction method used for FlickType is not well-suited for the sighted community. For example, "respect me" versus "correct me" are two fundamental difference with low-vision and sighted users, for a sighted user they expect that the letters they tap will be the letters shown in the word, whereas low-vision and blind users expect the expect the letters to be corrected when there are mis-taps and really just care about their intended word being shown in the suggestions. Our correction engine is pattern based and not letter based, because of this, we will not be pursuing the sighted market, of course, if a sighted user wants to use FlickType they can, but we will not be adjusting our correction method for them.

Warmly,
Ashley